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Late Payment of Interest on Bonds

nvestors sometimes complain to the SEC staff about late payments of interest owed to them on their bonds. The SEC, however, does not generally regulate this issue. Instead, the process for paying bondholders ordinarily involves banking transactions that are subject to the supervision of state and federal banking authorities.

Liability/Debt

An amount owed to a person or organization for borrowed funds. Loans, notes, bonds, and mortgages are forms of debt. These different forms all call for borrowers to pay back the amount they owe, typically with interest, by a specific date, which is set forth in the repayment terms.

Lifecycle Funds

A diversified mutual fund that automatically shifts towards a more conservative mix of investments as it approaches a particular year in the future, known as its "target date." A lifecycle fund investor picks a fund with the right target date based on his or her particular investment goal. The managers of the fund then make all decisions about asset allocation, diversification, and rebalancing. Lifecycle funds also are known as target date funds.

Limit Orders

A limit order is an order to buy or sell a security at a specific price. A buy limit order can only be executed at the limit price or lower, and a sell limit order can only be executed at the limit price or higher.

Liquidity (or Marketability)

Liquidity generally refers to how easily or quickly a security can be bought or sold in a secondary market. Liquid investments can be sold readily and without paying a hefty fee to get money when it is needed.

A stock’s liquidity generally refers to how rapidly shares of a stock can be bought or sold without substantially impacting the stock price. Stocks with low liquidity may be difficult to sell and may cause you to take a bigger loss if you cannot sell the shares when you want to.

Listing Standards

Before a company’s stock can begin trading on an exchange, the company must meet certain minimum financial and non-financial requirements, or "initial listing standards." Initial listing standards generally include a company’s total market value and stock price, and the number of publicly traded shares and shareholders of the company. Once listed on an exchange, a company must continue to meet a various financial and non-financial requirements, or “continued listing standards.” Continued listing standards are similar to initial listing standards, but may include additional requirements.

Load

The amount that investors pay when they buy (front-end load) or redeem (back-end load) shares in a mutual fund, similar to a commission. The SEC's rules do not limit sales loads a fund may charge, but FINRA's rules cap mutual fund sales loads at 8.5% of the purchase or sale, or at lower levels, depending on other fees and charges.

London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR)

The interest rates banks charge each other for short-term loans. LIBOR is frequently used as the base for resetting rates on floating-rate securities.

Lost and Stolen Securities Program

Congress directed the establishment of the Lost and Stolen Securities Program (LSSP) to curtail trafficking in lost, stolen, missing, and counterfeit securities certificates.  Rule 17f-1 under the Exchange Act governs LSSP operations.  The LSSP consists mainly of a database for securities that have been reported lost, stolen, missing, or counterfeit.

Lost or Stolen Stock Certificates

Brokerage firms, banks, transfer agents and corporations have procedures in place to help investors replace lost or stolen certificates.